Ancillary Courses

The following courses are partially concerned with classical antiquity. No more than the equivalent of TWO full courses (12 credits) may satisfy degree requirements in Classical Studies.

AP/ANTH 2140 3.0 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY & PREHISTORY

How did we, as human beings, become what we are? How do we know? This course has three main themes: first, the biological evolution of human beings and the historical development of human societies; second, the methods that paleoanthropologists and archaeologists use to study those aspects of the human past; and third, the social context of such endeavours to know the past.

The course begins with a brief introduction to basic anthropological principles and archaeological methods. We then very briefly consider human biological evolution, and modern human variation. This course then becomes primarily concerned with culture, rather than biology, and proceeds to cover certain key events and processes in human history, including farming, the emergence of complex technology, sedentism and social stratification.

The course concludes by comparing several ancient societies (e.g. pre- contact North America, Neolithic Europe, and Easter Island), and discussing how archaeology is used to understand recent historic events and contemporary life. Throughout the course, we maintain a careful awareness of the social contexts in which archaeology is done. Topics covered include: popular representations of archaeology, political uses of archaeology, disputes over human origins, issues surrounding the ownership of archaeological objects and the study of archaeological human remains, and conflicts and collaborations between archaeologists and indigenous peoples.

AP/ANTH 2150 3.0 EARLY CIVILIZATIONS

What does it mean to be 'civilized'? What can we learn from the rise and fall of previous civilizations? How have ancient cultural legacies shaped our world? How were past lives like our own? This course introduces students to anthropological archaeology's view of ancient civilizations, and illuminates the web of connections that links them to our 21st century global civilization.

The course begins by surveying anthropological principles, archaeological methods, and theories about the emergence of complex societies. We then explore ancient Old World civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, China, Africa, and the Mediterranean. Next, more particular attention is given to the ancient New World civilizations (Aztec, Maya, Inka), and complex societies of North America (Mississippian, Iroquois, and Northwest Coast cultures).

Themes investigated include ancient writing systems, belief systems, human-environment interaction, urbanization, culture contact, imperialism, colonization, slavery, and the historic collision of the Old and New Worlds. Throughout, the course also examines the history of archaeology itself – how and why archaeology developed – and ponders the implications.

The course concludes by appraising the forces, positive and negative, currently affecting archaeological heritage. These include descendant communities, repatriation, looting, tourism, the antiquities trade, the political deployment of archaeology, and the destruction of archaeological sites.

AP/HIST 2110 6.0 ANCIENT NEAR EAST

Civilization began in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and then Egypt. Shortly thereafter, civilizations developed all over the Near East (modern Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, and Iran). This course surveys major developments in the political, social, and cultural history of the peoples and states of this region.

In broad terms, the area covered by this course extends from the eastern Mediterranean to the Iranian plateau, and the time span ranges from about 3000 B.C. to the invasion of Alexander, some 2700 years later. Major peoples and states studied include Sumer, Akkad, Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, the Hittites, Israel, and Persia, but not all these groups and not all their history will receive equal emphasis.

History 2110 also investigates how we determine historical facts, especially the facts of ancient history. In this connection, we discuss problems and possibilities in the fields of archaeology, text interpretation, and historical geography, to name but three.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HIST 1090 6.0, AS/HIST 2110 6.0.

AP/HIST 3110 6.0 ANCIENT ISRAEL

Investigations include methodological limitations; Old Testament, archaeology and ideology; Israel's origins; the settlement of Canaan; Philistia and the Israelite state; the Davidic Revolutions; the twin kingdoms; Assyria, Babylonia and the end of the Israelite people.

AP/HUMA 1110 9.0 GREEK AND BIBLICAL TRADITIONS

A study of early Mesopotamian, Greek, Jewish and Christian literature (1) to understand its original meanings and (2) to explore its relevance to our search for personal ethical norms, images of female and male, models of the just society and conceptions of transcendent reality. The course aims to teach students methods of literary criticism, textual interpretation, historical inquiry, conceptual analysis, and cross-cultural comparisons.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1710 6.0, prior to Fall 2009: AK/HUMA 1710 6.0, AS/HUMA 1110 9.0.

AP/HUMA 2515 6.0 MYTHS AND THEIR MEANINGS

AP/HUMA 3810 6.0 HEBREW BIBLE/OLD TESTAMENT IN CONTEXT

A survey of the literature of ancient Israel concentrating on the Hebrew Bible with the context of its world. Students examine the text in translation and become familiar with a variety of literary, historical and theological approaches to the text.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HUMA 3415 3.0, AP/HUMA 3417 3.0, AK/HUMA 3415 3.0, AK/HUMA 3417 3.0, AS/HUMA 2810 6.0, AS/HUMA