4000 Level

Not all of the courses listed below will necessarily be offered in any given year.

With the approval of the program coordinator, and subject to course exclusion and residency requirements, students may complete other courses for program credit in classical studies.

AP/GK 4010 3.0 GREEK TRAGEDY

A study of one or more of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, or Euripides in the original ANCIENT GREEK. The course will include a review of ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary. The course is only suitable for students at an advanced level of language study. See prerequisites below.

PREREQUISITES:  six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS:  AP/GK 3010 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/GK 3010 3.00 and AS/GK 4010 3.00.

NOTE: Students who take this course at the 4000 level will be assigned extra work appropriate to that level

AP/GK 4030 3.0 GREEK EPIC POETRY

Readings from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey.

PREREQUISITES: six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator..

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/GK 3030 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  AS/GK 3030 3.00 and AS/GK 4030 3.00.

NOTE: Students who take this course at the 4000 level will be assigned extra work appropriate to that level

AP/GK 4040 3.0 GREEK HISTORIANS

A study of selected works by Greek historians such as Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon.

PREREQUISITES: six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/GK 3040 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/GK 3040 3.00 and AS/GK 4040 3.00.

NOTE: Students who take this course at the 4000 level will be assigned extra work appropriate to that level

AP/GK 4050 3.0 SOCRATES

This course studies the 5th-century Athenian philosopher Socrates through study of the sources, Plato and/or Xenophon, in the original Greek.

PREREQUISITES:  six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/GK 3050 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/GK 3050 3.00 and AS/GK 4050 3.00.

NOTE: Students who take this course at the 4000 level will be assigned extra work appropriate to that level

AP/GK 4060 3.0 GREEK RHETORIC

A study of one or more rhetorical works in the original Greek. Authors to be studied include Demosthenes, Aeschines, and Lysias.

PREREQUISITES: six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/GK 3060 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  AS/GK 3060 3.00 and AS/GK 4060 3.00.

NOTE: Students who take this course at the 4000 level will be assigned extra work appropriate to that level

AP/GK 4070 3.0 EARLY GREEK POETRY

This course introduces students to Greek poetry of the Archaic Period (c.700-480 BC) in the original Greek. In addition to the study of their language and literary form, the course also considers the social and political context of the poems.

PREREQUISITES: six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/GK 3070 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  AS/GK 3070 3.00 and AS/GK 4070 3.00.

AP/GK 4080 3.0 LATER GREEK PROSE

This course introduces students to Greek prose of the Roman Imperial Period in the original Greek. In addition to the study of language and literary form, the course also considers the social and political context of the works.

PREREQUISITES: six credits of Classical Greek at the 3000 level or permission of the Classical Studies co-ordinator.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/GK 3080 3.00. PRIOR TO FALL 2009:  AS/GK 3080 3.00 and AS/GK 4080 3.00.

AP/GK 4130 3.0/6.0 GUIDED READINGS IN GREEK AUTHORS

An independent reading program with material chosen in accordance with the interest of the student. To enrol, consult the Co-ordinator of Classical Studies.

PREREQUISITES: Six credits of Ancient Greek at the 3000 level. Permission of the Coordinator of Classical Studies.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: PRIOR TO FALL 2009: AS/GK 4130 3.00/6.00.

AP/GK 4140 6.0 HONOURS ESSAY

Open only to Honours candidates in Classics, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies.

PREREQUISITE: Six credits of Ancient Greek at the 3000 level. Permission of the Coordinator of Classical Studies.

AP/HIST 4010 = AP/CLST 4010 6.0 COLLOQUIUM IN ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN HISTORY

Advanced colloquium on selected topics in Ancient Greek and/or Roman History. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the Department of History website for further details.

PREREQUISITES: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 and AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HIST 4010 6.0.

NOTE: Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4012 = AP/CLST 4012 3.0 COLLOQUIUM IN ROMAN SOCIAL HISTORY

The course focuses on one or more key topics to deepen students' understanding of key concepts, methodologies and theoretical approaches in Roman social history. Topics vary from year to year, but may include: family and household; law and society; class, status, and social hierarchies; army and society; demography; work and labour; mobility and connectivity.

PREREQUISITES: AP/HIST 2100 6.0 or AP/HIST 3130 6.0 or AP/HIST 3131 6.0 or AP/HIST 3135 3.0 or AP/HIST 3136 6.0 or AP/HIST 3140 3.0 or AP/HIST 3154 3.0 or AP/HIST 3155 3.0 or AP/HIST 3160 6.0 or AP/HIST 4010 6.0 or AP/HIST 4122 6.0 or AP/HIST 4130 6.0 or AP/HIST 4140 6.0 or AP/HIST 4160 6.0 or AP/HUMA 2105 6.0 or AP/HUMA 3103 6.0 or AP/HUMA 3104 3.0 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.0 or AP/HUMA 4102 6.0 or AP/HUMA 4107 6.0 or departmental permission

AP/HIST 4116 = AP/CLST 4116 6.0 ALEXANDER THE GREAT: MYTH AND REALITY

This course studies the life of Alexander the Great. It seeks to set his achievements within the context of Greek, Macedonian and Near Eastern history, and to disentangle the truth about him from the often unreliable and conflicting sources.

PREREQUISITES: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS:  AP/HIST 4016 6.00, AS/HIST 4016 6.00, AS/HIST 4050K 6.00.

Notes: This is a seminar course. Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4122 = AP/CLST 4122 6.0 WAR AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE

This course examines the phenomenon of war in ancient Greece, with particular emphasis on its social impact, concentrating on the late Archaic and Classical periods (650-338 BC).

PREREQUISITES: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HIST 4122 6.00.

NOTE: This course is restricted to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4130 = AP/CLST 4130 6.0 PROBLEMS IN ROMAN HISTORY

Selected topics in one or more areas of concentration in the history of ancient Rome.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3106 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HIST 4130 6.00.

NOTE: Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4131 = AP/CLST 4131 6.0 THE CITY OF ROME, 200 BC-AD 200

This course examines the history of the City of Rome during the late Republic and early Principate from an archaeological, literary, and art historical perspective.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HIST 4131 6.00.

AP/HIST 4132 = AP/CLST 4132 6.0 CAESAR'S PALACE: A SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ROMAN IMPERIAL COURT

Roman emperors have traditionally been studied from the point of view of the political decisions that they made. Until recently, less emphasis has been given to the court of which they formed the centre. In this course, we examine the new contributions that the historical field of ‘court studies’ are making to our understanding of the Roman emperor and his court. Topics to be covered include: the roles of concubines, freedmen, slaves, and eunuchs at court; aristocrats at court; political and artistic patronage; the physical contexts of court life; and imperial journeys. Sources to be used include: Suetonius; Tacitus; Cassius Dio; and the Historia Augusta. A major goal of the course is to give students the opportunity to undertake an original research project on the court of a particular Roman emperor. Students are also introduced to the sociological and comparative methodologies used to study royal courts in a range of historical eras from the Ancient Near East to the Early Modern period, and we examine how these methodologies can be applied to the study of the Roman imperial court.

PREREQUISITES: AP/HIST 1100 6.00 or AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3136 6.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3155 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: AP/HIST 4130 6.00, 2013-14, 2014-15, and 2015-16.

NOTE: Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4140 = AP/CLST 4140 6.0 PROBLEMS IN HELLENISTIC HISTORY

Selected topics in one or more areas of concentration in the history of the Mediterranean world of Alexander the Great and his successors.

PREREQUISITES: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HIST 4140 6.00.

NOTE: Priority is given to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

AP/HIST 4160 = AP/CLST 4160 6.0 SLAVERY IN ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

This course explores the phenomenon of slavery in Greek and Roman antiquity, from the Bronze Age until the later Roman empire. Three main thematic areas are covered: ancient attitudes to and theories of slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, the role of slaves in the ancient economy, and the position of slaves in Greek and Roman society. Throughout the course we examine both the continuities within the Greco-Roman world and the ways in which beliefs and practices varied from place to place and over time. Subjects for particular study include: ancient justifications and criticisms of slavery; slavery and ethnicity; the freeing of slaves and the status of freed men and women; the slave trade; slavery and imperialism; slave revolts; slavery and agriculture; the treatment of slaves; slavery and Christianity. Consideration is also given to comparative evidence from other historical periods, and to theoretical writings on slavery.

AP/HUMA 4100 = AP/CLST 4100 6.0 THE PASTORAL LYRIC TRADITION FROM ANCIENT GREECE TO EARLY MODERNITY

This course explores the tradition of pastoral lyric poetry from the world of Ptolemaic Alexandria to late medieval and renaissance Europe, studying the pastoral poetry of, among others, Theocritus, Vergil, Moduin of Autun, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Mantuan, Spenser, Milton and Marvell. The course interrogates the poetics of pastoral, the dynamics of tradition, and classicism and classical reception to the seventeenth century.

AP/HUMA 4101 = AP/CLST 4101 6.0 STUDIES IN CLASSICAL CULTURE

A study of representative visual and textual narratives in Greek and Roman society which characteristically featured the social, political ideological and programmatic symbols and imagery of their time.

AP/HUMA 4102 = AP/CLST 4102 6.0 CALIGULA, CLAUDIUS AND NERO

This course focuses on ancient Roman literature and culture in and around the years 37 - 68 CE, spanning the reigns of the emperors Caligula, Claudius and Nero. This period marks the decline and dramatic end of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, established by the emperor Augustus in 28 BCE. The court of the Roman emperors in this period is infamous in western culture for its excess, love of luxury and the moral decline in Roman leadership. Nero's name, in particular, is synonymous with extravagance, cruelty, and the madness induced by unlimited power. In this course we examine the foundations of these representations by reviewing a wide range of sources for the first-century CE Rome: historiographical, archaeological, literary, architectural, etc. We will ask: what factors led to the historical opinion of these 'bad' emperors? And further, how and why do we engage today with this source material and the questions it raises? Topics to be covered include: the conflicted representations of these political figures; the relationship of literature and politics; satire and censorship; Roman imperialism; Roman spectacle; ancient historiography; the Roman empire on film and in popular culture. REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: Tacitus, Annals of Imperial Rome; Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars; Petronius, The Satyricon; Seneca, Dialogues, Tragedies, Letters; Lucan, Civil Wars. Films: Quo Vadis; Caligula; The Robe; Demetrius and the Gladiators.

AP/HUMA 4103 = AP/CLST 4103 6.0 INTERPRETATIONS OF HOMERIC EPIC

This course examines the Iliad and the Odyssey through study of some of the various interpretive strategies, both ancient and modern, which have been applied to these texts.

AP/HUMA 4104 = AP/CLST 4104 6.0 THE WORLD OF APULEIUS

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/HUMA 4105 = AP/CLST 4105 6.0 THE RHETORICAL TRADITION

Rhetoric originated in ancient Greece as the art of speaking in public - in the law courts, in political assemblies, and wherever persuasion and eloquence were valued. For more than two thousand years rhetoric was a fundamental part of the Western education system; it became the basic training for writers such as Shakespeare and James Joyce; and it remains an important though often unrecognized force in our own times in law, politics, and advertising. The issues raised by rhetoric range from detailed consideration of word order and usage to the formation of the writer's personality and the relation between the writer and the audience. This course examines the forms of rhetoric and its social function from the Classical cultures of Greece and Rome to our own time. Topics for the course include the technical handbooks (such as Aristotle's Rhetoric); selected speeches (by Demosthenes, Cicero, Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, among others); the role of rhetoric in literature (Shakespeare and others); the philosophic critique of rhetoric (Plato); and the role of rhetoric in modern advertising and politics. The course includes practical application of rhetorical theory through the writing and delivery of two short speeches.

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: Aristotle: The Art of Rhetoric, Translated by Hugh Lawson- Tancred. London: Penguin; Clark, Matthew. A Matter of Style, Oxford University Press; Kennedy, George, A New History of Classical Rhetoric, Princeton: Princeton University Press; Lanham, Richard, A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms, Second Edition. Berkeley: University of California Press; Plato: Gorgias. Translated by Robin Waterfield. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Shakespeare, William. Julius Caesar, New York: Signet. Course kit, including speeches and passages by various authors, including Cicero, Charles Dickens, Abraham Lincoln, William Faulkner, Winston Churchill, and others.

AP/HUMA 4106 = AP/CLST 4106 6.0 WRITING IN A CULTURE OF LETTERS

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/HUMA 4107 = AP/CLST 4107 6.0 THE ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN NOVEL

The five surviving Greek romance-novels, which date to the period between the first century AD and perhaps the later fourth century, all belong to the Greek literature of the Roman Empire. Curiously none of these texts makes reference to Rome; instead, they tend to fix their gaze in temporal terms on a distant, classical past, while geographically they look towards the outlying regions of the Greek world where Hellenism rubs shoulders with the other cultures of the Mediterranean, Africa, and the Middle East. The narratives of these works typically involve a young and beautiful couple, a hero and heroine whose love for each other endures pirates, shipwrecks, incarceration, and the spectres of seduction, rape, and betrayal. Normative and unsurprising though these romantic narratives of youthful passion and fidelity may seem to a twenty-first-century readership, their literary representation stands in pointed opposition to the realities of ancient Greek marriage practice, and it is all but without parallel in any other genre of ancient Greek literature.

The extant Roman novels, which date from the first and second centuries AD, drew on the pre-existing genre of the Greek romance, but they parody its emphasis on the faithful, youthful devotion of a young man and a young woman with an admixture of everything from underclass realism and ribald comedy to magic, witchcraft, and mystery religion: what survives of Petronius tells the story of the picaresque adventures of a homosexual couple, while the plot of Apuleius is based around the transformation of a young man into a singularly unfortunate, long-eared equine.

Methodologically this course emphasizes reading the ancient Greek and Roman novels in the historical and cultural context of the Roman empire in the first few centuries AD, with special attention to their form, narrative dynamics, and generic self-fashioning: the ancient Greek and Roman novels are large-scale prose texts that claim as their territory culturally and politically centrifugal fictional narratives. In other words, the ancient novels self-consciously avoid the political and cultural mainstream in an attempt to pioneer new literary cartographies of social space, enthusiastically seeking the geographical boundaries of the known world and exploring a demimonde of socially-excluded deviants, criminals, and other outcasts; they therefore make fertile ground for the investigation of such issues as canon-formation and perpetuation, generic filiation and alienation, narratology, cultural identity, and the history of sexuality. This course explores the politics of trying to escape the orbit of the cultural centre of gravity, and questions the successes, failures, and the sincerity of the attempts of the ancient Greek and Roman novelists to do so.

AP/HUMA 4108 = AP/CLST 4108 3.0 THE ANCIENT GREEK NOVEL

description needed

AP/HUMA 4827 = AP/CLST 4827 3.0 GRAECO-ROMAN, BIBLICAL, AND EARLY CHRISTIAN CONCEPTS OF THE SOUL

This course explores concepts of soul from early Greek Civilization to the early Christian era. It examines a cluster of related concepts -- soul, spirit, shade, consciousness, will, and mind - that express the self or "inner person". Entailed are soul as a thing separate from body; sensation and perception; relation of soul to body; conflict within the soul; and the soul's eternity.

AP/LA 4010 3.0 ROMAN EPIC POETRY

A study of two Augustan epics: Vergil's Aeneid and Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Prerequisite: At least six credits at the 3000 level in Latin.

AP/LA 4020 3.0 ROMAN LYRIC POETRY

PREREQUISITE: six credits of Latin at the 3000 level.

AP/LA 4030 3.0 ROMAN ELEGIAC POETRY

This course focuses on the elegiac poetry written by three Roman elegiac poets of the Augustan Age: Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid. Course work involves reading and translating the Latin texts with attention to grammar, syntax, morphology, vocabulary, and contexts (literary, cultural, social, historical, philosophical, and thematic).

AP/LA 4040 3.0 ROMAN PHILOSOPHICAL WRITINGS

This course focuses on the prose works of the Roman philosophical writers Cicero and Seneca the Younger. Course work involves reading and translating the Latin texts with full understanding of grammar, syntax, morphology, vocabulary, and contexts (literary, cultural, social, historical, and thematic). Students also have the opportunity to write a research essay in the course.

PREREQUISITE: six credits of Latin at the 3000 level.

AP/LA 4050 6.0 SURVEY OF LATIN LITERATURE

NEED DESCRIPTION

PREREQUISITE: six credits of Latin at the 3000 level.

AP/LA 4060 3.0 ROMAN HISTORIANS

 

NEED DESCRIPTION

PREREQUISITE: six credits of Latin at the 3000 level.

AP/LA 4070 3.0 ROMAN RHETORIC

PREREQUISITE: six credits of LATIN at the 3000 level.

AP/LA 4080 3.0 ROMAN DRAMA

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/LA 4110 3.0 THE ROMAN NOVEL

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/LA 4120 3.0 ROMAN SATIRE

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/LA 4130 3.0/6.0 GUIDED READINGS IN ROMAN AUTHORS

An independent reading program with material chosen in accordance with the interest of the student. To enrol, consult the Co-ordinator of Classical Studies.

PREREQUISITE: Six credits of Latin at the 3000 level. Permission of the Co-ordinator of Classical Studies.

AP/LA 4140 6.0 HONOURS ESSAYS

Open only to Honours candidates in Classics or Classical Studies.

PREREQUISITE: Six credits of Latin at the 3000 level. Permission of the Co-ordinator of Classical Studies.

AP/PHIL 4030 = AP/CLST 4030 3.0 TOPICS IN ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

This seminar course closely examines an important work of one of the great ancient philosophers. Alternatively, it may also focus on an important area or theme of ancient philosophy including, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and political theory.

PREREQUISITE: At least 9 credits in Philosophy.

AP/POLS 4035 = AP/CLST 4035 3.0 CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY

An analysis of a number of texts in classical political theory, focusing on primary texts rather than secondary works, relevant to Greek, Hellenistic and Roman politics.