3000 Level

Not all of the courses listed below will necessarily be offered in any given year.

With the approval of the program coordinator, and subject to course exclusion and residency requirements, students may complete other courses for program credit in classical studies.

AP/GK 3010 3.0 GREEK TRAGEDY

This course involves a guided reading of an ancient Greek tragedy in the original ANCIENT GREEK. The course is only suitable for students at an advanced level of language study.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.0 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/GK 3030 3.0 GREEK EPIC POETRY

This course involves a guided reading of one or more books of Homer's Iliad or Odyssey in the original ANCIENT GREEK. The course is only suitable for students at an advanced level of language study. See prerequisite below.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.0 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/GK 3040 3.0 GREEK HISTORIANS

This course involves a guided reading from the works of one or more ancient Greek historians (Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon) in the original ANCIENT GREEK. The course is only suitable for students at an advanced level of language study. See prerequisite below.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.0 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/GK 3050 3.0 SOCRATES

This course studies the 5th-century BC Athenian philosopher Socrates through a guided reading of the earliest sources, Plato and/or Xenophon, in the original ANCIENT GREEK. The course is only suitable for students at an advanced level of language study. See prerequisite below.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.0 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/GK 3060 3.0 GREEK RHETORIC

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/GK 3070 3.0 EARLY GREEK POETRY

This course introduces students to Greek poetry of the Archaic Period (c.700-480 BC) through a guided reading of a selection of poems in the original ANCIENT GREEK. In addition to the study of their language and literary form, the course also considers the social and political context of the poems.

Prerequisite: AP/GK 2000 6.00 or permission of Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/GK 3080 3.0 LATER GREEK PROSE

This course introduces students to Greek prose of the Roman Imperial Period through a guided reading of selected texts in the original ANCIENT GREEK. In addition to the study of language and literary form, the course also considers the social and political context of the works.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.00 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/HIST 3120 = AP/CLST 3120 6.0 CLASSICAL ATHENS: STATE AND SOCIETY

This course studies Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries BC, concentrating on social and economic structures and institutions.

AP/HIST 3125 = AP/CLST 3125 3.0 SPORT AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE

Sport occupied an important place in the highly competitive society of ancient Greece. This course explores the history of Greek sport from its first appearance in the poems of Homer down into the Roman period, but with a concentration on the Archaic and Classical periods and on the Panhellenic games.

Throughout the course sport is studied not as an autonomous activity, but as a part of Greek society, only comprehensible in terms of the values and practices of that society. Topics include: theories of sport; the competitive character of Greek society; the development of the sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia and of the Olympic Games; the Olympic Games and Festival; the other Panhellenic games; sport and politics; sport and religious ritual; combat sports and military training; sport and social status; amateurs and professionals; the gymnasium and the palaistra; representations of sport in art and literature. The course involves the critical study of a wide range of source material-literary, documentary, iconographic and archaeological.

AP/HIST 3130 = AP/CLST 3130 6.0 THE ROMAN REVOLUTION

The slow decline of the Roman Republican system offers historians one of, if not the, greatest and most detailed pictures of a government's collapse. In this course, we will study that collapse and what it can teach us about political compromise, competition, and conflict. Taking as a starting point the functioning Republic of the Punic Wars, we will continue through the (re?)foundation of monarchy two hundred years later. This was a period of extensive expansion abroad as well as intense strife at home; we will examine both types of conflict to gain a better understanding of the transformation of Roman society.

AP/HIST 3131 = AP/CLST 3131 6.0 ROME AND EMPIRE: WAR TO PAX ROMANA

At its height, the Roman Empire stretched from the snows of Scotland to the sands of Egypt. A population of around sixty million people lived and died within its frontiers. It endured for hundreds of years, with few serious challenges. It was, in short, a stunning phenomenon that demands explanation. In this course, we shall attempt to understand it. We shall begin by examining how and why the Romans acquired their Empire in the first place. We shall also examine how the Romans rationalized the violence and domination that Empire entailed. In the later part of the course, attention will be given to how Rome governed the Empire and dealt with threats to its rule. Finally, we look at how Roman rule changed the cultures of the provinces - and how the provinces changed the culture of Rome itself.

AP/HIST 3135 = AP/CLST 3135 3.0 SPECTACLE AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT ROME

This course traces the development of gladiatorial presentations, chariot-races and other public spectacles in Rome, Italy and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to 400 AD. It concentrates in particular on their changing nature, scale and socio-cultural function.

AP/HIST 3136 = AP/CLST 3136 6.0 ROMAN SPAIN: ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY

The course examines the historical value of archaeological evidence by applying archaeological theory and method to the excavation of a late-Iberian/early-Roman site of Cabrera de Mar, Barcelona, Spain.

AP/HIST 3140 = AP/CLST 3140 3.0 THE CITY IN THE ROMAN WORLD

"No city has existed in the whole world that could be compared with Rome for size," wrote Pliny the Elder during the first century AD. He would have been equally correct to add that the other three or four main cities of the Roman Empire were also bigger than anything seen before. What is more, no city was ever to reach this size again in Europe until well into the industrial revolution. Roman cities, in other words, were a truly stunning phenomenon in their size, complexity and grandeur. How do we explain their existence? How did these cities relate to the countryside and to the rest of the Empire? What role did the monumentalization of public space in cities play in elite competition for power and prestige? These questions are vital to anyone wanting to understand the ancient Mediterranean World, and, indeed, to anyone wanting to understand the phenomenon of urbanism in more recent periods of European history. Using a range of evidence, written and archaeological, we shall answer these questions.

AP/HIST 3145 3.0 ROMAN BRITAIN

This course studies the history of Roman Britain from Julius Caesar’s invasions of Britain in 55 and 54 BC until the end of Roman rule in the 5th century AD.

AP/HIST 3150 = AP/CLST 3150 6.0 EARLY GREEK HISTORY

This course examines the political, social, economic and intellectual history of Greece in the Bronze Age and the Archaic Period. It covers Mycenaean Greece, the Dark Age, and the rise of the city-state and culminates in the Persian Wars.

AP/HIST 3152 = AP/CLST 3152 6.0 CLASSICAL GREEK HISTORY

Description

AP/HIST 3154 = AP/CLST 3154 3.0 EGYPT FROM ALEXANDER TO CLEOPATRA

The occupation of Egypt by Alexander the Great and the establishment of the Ptolemaic monarchy resulted in a significant influx of settlers from all around the Greek world. In this course, we examine the complex social, cultural, and political negotiations that resulted from this ancient episode of colonialism. How did the Ptolemaic monarchs, who had established their dynasty by force, attempt to obtain political legitimacy in the eyes of both Greeks and Egyptians? Were relations between Greeks and Egyptians characterised mainly by fruitful interaction, or by hostility and suspicion? Was there a synthesis of Egyptian and Hellenic culture, or did the two remain radically separate? In this course, we seek to explore these questions, especially by exploiting the abundant papyrological evidence from the Ptolemaic period.

AP/HIST 3155 = AP/CLST 3155 3.0 EGYPT AFTER CLEOPATRA: SOCIETY AND CULTURE IN A ROMAN PROVINCE

When Egypt came under Roman rule in 30 BC, its administrative machinery certainly changed. But what of the social and cultural impacts of these transitions? Did the inhabitants of Egypt begin to identify as Romans? Did political and administrative change really impinge on the deeper structures and processes of life on the Nile, such as the relationship of people to their gods, the interactions between men and women, and the cycle of births and deaths? In this course we explore these issues, making particular use of the rich papyrological evidence from the period.

AP/HIST 3160 = AP/CLST 3160 6.0 WOMEN AND GENDER IN ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

This course challenges the traditional dichotomy of women's and great man history by addressing questions of gender roles and their social functions in Greek and Roman society. Surviving evidence from the ancient world is primarily literature written by men of the upper strata of society. A major focus of this course will be to determine what these texts can tell us: are they idealizing, normative, realistic, or a mixture? What can we learn about societal roles and expectations of both men, women, and those who cross the line in antiquity? Topics run the gamut from the recent re-interpretation of Neolithic "Venus" figurines to the Passion of Perpetua. Material is taken up chronologically and includes written evidence (both documentary and literary), archaeological finds (such as votive offerings, tomb reliefs, and vase paintings), and modern gender theory. In this way, we can examine the way that women and men represented themselves and each other in both public and private modes.

AP/HUMA 3100 = AP/CLST 3100 6.0 GREEK DRAMA AND CULTURE

A survey of ancient Greek drama in translation. The plays will be looked at mainly in terms of structure, religious thought, and political expression.

AP/HUMA 3102 = AP/CLST 3102 3.0 ANCIENT GREEK TRAGIC DRAMA

description

AP/HUMA 3103 = AP/CLST 3103 6.0 CHILDHOOD AND CHILDREN IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN

This course examines childhood experience and the social construction of childhood in the ancient Mediterranean from the Bronze Age down to the end of classical antiquity.

AP/HUMA 3104 = AP/CLST 3104 6.0 EROS AND AMOR: SEX AND GENDER IN GRECO-ROMAN LITERATURE

Examines issues of gender and sexuality in Greco-Roman culture through reading Greek and Roman literature in translation.

AP/HUMA 3105 = AP/CLST 3105 6.0 GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGION

This course explores literary and archeological evidence for practices associated with honouring the gods in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds. We will be attentive to variations in practice and belief from one locale to another and from one level of society to another.

AP/HUMA 3107 = AP/CLST 3107 6.0 ROMAN REPUBLICAN LITERATURE

This course surveys the literature and culture of the Roman Republic, 509 - 31 BCE. Beginning with the material and cultural record of pre-historical Rome in the 7th to 3rd centuries, this course examines the song and performance culture of Early Rome. The course then considers the fusion of Greek and Italian elements that laid the foundation for the development of the distinctly Roman literature that emerged in the 2nd century BCE, amidst the establishment of Rome as a hegemonic power throughout the Mediterranean world.

The course then traces the growth and dramatic changes in Roman literature that correspond to the decades of civil war and turbulent politics that bring the Republic to an end (130 - 30 BCE). Major topics of analysis will be the relationship of literature to politics, militarism in literature, memory in literature, myths of Roman origin, song and performance culture, Roman translation of Greek literature, cultural responses to empire, Romanitas (Roman-ness) as expressed in literature, gender and class distinctions in literature and performance.Ancient literature to be analyzed includes: comedy and tragedy; epic poetry; Roman philosophical writing; erotic and lyric poetry, historiography; biography; political and forensic rhetoric; and satire. We will also review major scholarly approaches to the study of Roman literature. Major authors include Plautus, Terence, Cato the Elder, Ennius, Lucretius, Catullus, Sallust, Livy and Cicero.

AP/HUMA 3108 = AP/CLST 3108 6.0 ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN COMIC DRAMA

This course explores the evolving tradition of ancient Greek and Roman comic drama from later fifth-century BCE Athens to the early second-century Roman Republic, studying the works of the playwrights Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence, their influence on the development of the Western Canon, selected topics in Greek and Roman social and cultural history, and the theory of the comic.

AP/HUMA 3110 = AP/CLST 3110 6.0 ROMAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY

This course examines literature, art and architecture in its social and cultural context within a specified period of Roman history. The course may focus on either the late Republic or the age of Augustus of the age of Nero or the age of Trajan.

AP/HUMA 3115 = AP/CLST 3115 6.0 MYTH IN ANCIENT GREECE: TEXTS AND THEORIES

This course examines Greek myths of gods and heroes in their social, religious and historical contexts through close reading of primary texts and visual representations and through analysis of modern comparative, psychoanalytical and structuralist theories.

AP/HUMA 3421 = AP/CLST 3421 3.0 INTERPRETING THE NEW TESTAMENT I

A historical and literary study of the traditions of Paul and of the Beloved Disciple (“John”) as they developed from the time of their founders through several generations of followers.

AP/HUMA 3422 = AP/CLST 3422 3.0 INTERPRETING THE NEW TESTAMENT II

A historical and literary study of the synoptic gospels (Mark, Matthew, Luke) and of other early Christian literature of the first three generations.

AP/HUMA 3423 3.0 THE NEW TESTAMENT APOCRYPHA (ancillary course)

This course analyzes texts excluded from the New Testament, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Infancy Gospel of James, and the Apocalypse of Peter. It discusses what these texts truly say about Jesus and why they are important for the study of Early Christianity.

AP/HUMA 3435 = AP/CLST 3435 3.0 AUGUSTINE

A study of the life and seminal ideas of Augustine of Hippo. Setting his ideas in the context of his life story, the course explores his teaching on such themes as religion, education, philosophy, grade and free will, sexuality and politics.

AP/HUMA 3439 3.0 HOW THE IRISH SAVED CIVILIZATION

Examines the remarkable cultural achievements of the Irish, how they kept the lamps of learning, literature and material culture (manuscript, painting, ornamental metalwork) burning following the barbarian invasions of the fifth century and the decline of Roman civilization on the continent.

AP/HUMA 3457 3.0 GNOSTICISM (ancillary course)

This course examines the early, radical alternative version of Christianity and Judaism based on mystical self-knowledge (gnosis), and the challenge it posed to orthodox views on such issues as authority, the role of women, wisdom and organizational structure.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 3457 6.00.

AP/LA 3010 3.0 ROMAN EPIC POETRY

A study of two Augustan epics: Vergil's Aeneid and Ovid's Metamorphoses.

PREREQUISITE: AP/LA 2000 6.00 or permission of the Coordinator of the Program in Classical Studies.

AP/LA 3020 3.0 ROMAN LYRIC POETRY

PREREQUISITE: AP/LA 2000 6.00 or permission of the Coordinator of the Program in Classical Studies.

AP/LA 3030 3.0 ROMAN ELEGIAC POETRY

This course focuses on the elegiac poetry written by three Roman elegiac poets of the Augustan Age: Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid. Course work involves on reading and translating the Latin texts with full understanding of grammar, syntax, morphology, vocabulary, and contexts (literary, cultural, social, historical, and thematic). This course meets with AP/LA 4030.

updated: 2013 (AML)

AP/LA 3040 3.0 ROMAN PHILOSOPHICAL WRITINGS

This course focuses on the prose works of the Roman philosophical writers Cicero and Seneca the Younger. Course work involves reading and translating the Latin texts with attention to grammar, syntax, morphology, vocabulary, and contexts (literary, cultural, social, historical, philosophical, and thematic).

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.00 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/LA 3050 6.0 SURVEY OF LATIN LITERATURE

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/LA 3060 3.0 ROMAN HISTORIANS

The course examines the main principles of Roman historiography through a close study in the original Latin of the work of one or more Roman historians.

PREREQUISITE: AP/LA 2000 6.0 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/LA 3070 3.0 ROMAN RHETORIC

The course examines the main principles of Roman rhetoric through a study in the original Latin of selected speeches of Cicero, speeches incorporated into other Roman prose texts, and passages from works of rhetorical theory.

PREREQUISITE: AP/LA 2000 6.00 or permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies Programme.

AP/LA 3080 3.0 ROMAN DRAMA

FACULTY: AP

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/LA 3110 3.0 THE ROMAN NOVEL

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/LA 3120 3.0 ROMAN SATIRE

NEED DESCRIPTION

AP/PHIL 3600 = AP/CLST 3600 3.0 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

Plato's Republic is the first known systematic account of an utopian society in western literature. It is arguably the most influential and famous philosophical and political treatise ever written. The Republic expounds Plato's conception of the perfectly just state (the standard against which all other states, in his eyes, can be judged to be just or unjust). In this course we will examine the background, structure and arguments of the Republic.

PREREQUISITE: At least one of: AP/PHIL 2010 3.0 or AP/PHIL 2015 3.0