2000 Level

Not all of the courses listed below will necessarily be offered in any given year.

With the approval of the program coordinator, and subject to course exclusion and residency requirements, students may complete other courses for program credit in classical studies.

AP/GK 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL AND BIBLICAL GREEK

The course concentrates on building knowledge of grammar and vocabulary with the aim of reading passages in original Greek. The first part of the course consists of review of grammar and vocabulary presented in GK 1000. The second part of the course completes the first-year textbook. The third part of the course introduces continuous passages of original Greek. .

Prerequisite: AP/GK 1000 6.0 or AP/GK 1400 6.0 or the equivalent with a grade of C+ or higher.

AP/HIST 2100 = AP/CLST 2100 6.0 ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

This course offers a general introduction to the history of ancient Greece and Rome. It surveys the ancient world from the Greek Bronze Age in the second millennium B.C. until the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century A.D. Specific periods are studied with emphasis on the social, economic, and political history of each. Extensive use is made of primary sources (in translation), with special attention devoted to the evaluation of literary, archaeological, and documentary evidence.

Among the areas covered are Homeric society, the development of the polis in archaic and classical Greece, Athenian society in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C., the rise of Rome, politics and society in late Republican Rome, and the society, economy, and political structure of the Roman Empire. Texts, read in translation, typically include a selection of the following: Homer's Odyssey; the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides; selected Greek plays, law-court speeches, and documentary inscriptions; Plutarch's lives of eminent Romans; the speeches of Cicero; the historical works of Sallust and Tacitus; Suetonius' biographies of Roman emperors; and the letters of Pliny.

Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 2635 6.0, GL/HUMA 2635 6.0.

AP/HIST 2150 = AP/CLST 2150 6.0 CLASSICAL GREEK AND ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY: AN INTRODUCTION

The course provides an introduction to the history, theory and methodology of Classical Greek and Roman Archaeology. It examines key archaeological excavations in the Graeco-Roman world to explore the history of Greek and Roman archaeology, c. 1700 to the present. Introducing students to the formation processes of the archaeological record, it also examines modern archaeological methodology, theory and recording techniques.

GL/HIST 2932 = AP/CLST 2932 = GL/HUMA 2932 = GL/SOSC 2932 3.0 ANCIENT HISTORY PART I (GREECE)

FACULTY: Glendon

This course explores ancient Mediterranean history from the early third millennium BCE through the rise and fall of Alexander the Great in the third century BCE. Proceeding chronologically, the course emphasizes the interdependence of social-political developments and intellectual-cultural movements.

Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 2540 6.00 and GL/HIST 2635 6.00.

GL/HIST 2935 = AP/CLST 2935 = GL/HUMA 2935 = GL/SOSC 2935 3.0 ANCIENT HISTORY PART II (ROME)

FACULTY: Glendon

This course surveys the History of Ancient Rome from the founding of the Republic (753 BCE) to the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century. Proceeding chronologically, the course emphasizes the interdependence of socio-political developments and intellectual-cultural movements.

Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 2540 6.00 and GL/HIST 2635 6.00

AP/HUMA 2100 = AP/CLST 2110 6.0 THE WORLD OF THE ANCIENT GREEKS

A study of the culture of the Greek speaking peoples of the Hellenic and Hellenistic Mediterranean at various points in their development and evolution. Areas of cultural endeavours to be explored include drama, epic, gender, law, philosophy, history and rhetoric.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 2100 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2100 9.00.

AP/HUMA 2105 = AP/CLST 2105 6.0 ROMAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

An introduction to Roman literature and culture, circa 200 BC to AD 200. Emphasis is placed on the literature, art and architecture of the Romans and on the impact of Roman culture on those peoples under Roman rule.

Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2105 9.00.

AP/HUMA 2115 6.0 LAW AND CULTURE IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

An investigation of the relationship between law and culture in the Ancient World and how cultural values and symbols intrude in the law, and how the law in turn appears in, and shapes, ritual art and literature.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2115 9.00.

AP/HUMA 2830 = AP/CLST 6.0 THE FOUNDERS OF CHRISTIANITY

An introduction to the literature and history of the early Christian communities in Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, Greece and Rome. The varieties of early Christian thought and practice are examined in terms of their religious, cultural and political contexts.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2830 9.00.

GL/HUMA 2922 = GL/LIN 2922 6.0 INTERMEDIATE LATIN

FACULTY: Glendon

The course surveys advanced Classical Latin grammar and syntax and then proceeds to the translation of selected original passages from Latin prose and verse; selections may include passages from Classical Latin authors and Medieval Latin.

NB: Students with high school experience in Latin wishing to take this course with no prerequisite must pass a qualifying examination.

Prerequisite: GL/HUMA 1622 6.00 or permission of the department.

Course credit exclusion: AP/LA 2000 6.00.

AP/LA 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE LATIN

The course begins with a review of Latin grammar and syntax and then concentrates on the reading of selected passages from Latin prose and verse in the original Latin. Selections may include passages from Ovid, Catullus, Cicero, Caesar, and selections from the Latin Bible.

NB: Students who have had Latin in high school and who wish to enter this course directly must pass a placement test; please consult the Co-ordinator of the Programme in Classical Studies.

Prerequisite: AP/LA 1000 6.0 or AP/LA 1400 6.0 or equivalent with a grade of C+ or higher.

AP/PHIL 2010 = AP/CLST 2010 3.0 ORIGINS OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY

An examination of the origin and early development of western philosophy. The works of the first philosophers, the Presocratics, will be introduced and contextualized, providing an indispensable background to Plato and Aristotle, and the continuing development of philosophy.

Course credit exclusion: AK/AS/PHIL 2010 3.0.

AP/PHIL 2015 = AP/CLST 2015 3.0 PLATO AND ARISTOTLE

Plato and Aristotle are two of the pillars of philosophy. This course will introduce students to some of their most influential theses and works with a special emphasis on Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Students will also be introduced to the question of how and why their two opposite approaches to philosophy, rationalism and empiricism, still divide philosophers today.

Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 2015 3.0.

FA/VISA 2520 3.0 GREEK ART AND ARCHITECTURE

This course studies the art of Greece in all media (vase painting, sculpture, architecture) from its origins in Aegean times through the Hellenistic period. Works of art are set in their philosophic, literary and dramatic context, and their social and economic background is considered. Extensive use of Toronto area museum collections is included.

Prerequisite: FA/VISA 1110 6.00.

FA/VISA 2530 3.0 ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

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