1000 Level

Not all of the courses listed below will necessarily be offered in any given year.

With the approval of the program coordinator, and subject to course exclusion and residency requirements, students may complete other courses for program credit in classical studies.

Students may count a maximum of 12 credits of ancillary courses towards their Classical Studies major or minor.

AP/GK 1000 6.0 ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL GREEK

This course is designed for those who have little or no training in Ancient Greek, which is essentially the Attic dialect spoken and written by the Athenians of the fifth and fourth centuries BC. No knowledge of the language is assumed. The course uses the pronunciation of Ancient Greek that was established by Erasmus in the sixteenth century (the reformed pronunciation). In this course, students will acquire the fundamentals of Ancient Greek through reading and work with Ancient Greek pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, syntax, translation, and some composition. After the course, students may move to the intermediate 2000-level Greek course and then on to the advanced 3000-level and 4000-level Greek courses at York.

PREREQUISITE: None. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed. No one who has completed an upper-level university Classical Greek course may enrol in this course. No one may enrol in this course and an upper-level Classical Greek course simultaneously.

AP/HIST 1100 = AP/CLST 1100 6.0 GLADIATORS, GODS, GIGOLOS, AND GOTHS: READING ROMAN SOCIETY, c.200 BCE-c.500 CE

Ancient Roman society is one of the most strangely familiar of all past societies. It is in many ways recognizable, since it helped form the modern societies of western Europe; yet it also had features that are bizarre and shocking to modern sensibilities. In this course, we take a number of case studies from this fascinating society as a context in which to develop the skill of critically reading and interpreting a wide variety of texts, employing the full range of methods and approaches used by scholars in the Humanities.  The modules of the course are as follows: gladiators and spectacles; Roman sexualities; slavery; the Roman soldier in war and peace; religion and religious persecution; and the Germanic invasions and decline of the West in late Antiquity. We examine a variety of sources, including poems, wall paintings, biographies, histories, religious writings, inscribed funerary epitaphs, gladiatorial weapons and armour, shipwrecks, and buildings.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

GL/HIST 1618 = AP/CLST 1618 3.0 ANCIENT ROOTS OF MODERN HISTORY

This course examines the discipline of history through the major works of Greek and Roman antiquity. The course begins with the origins of the historical discipline and proceeds to examine how it changed in response to social and political crises.

AP/HUMA 1100 9.0 THE WORLDS OF ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

A study of the classical world with a view to understanding the origin and evolution of some of the literary, philosophical, and political ideals of ancient Greece and Rome. Materials for this study will be drawn from Greek and Roman literature in translation, with illustration from the plastic arts.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1710 6.00

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 1100 9.00, AK/HUMA 1710 6.00

AP/HUMA 1105 = AP/CLST 1105 9.0 MYTH AND IMAGINATION IN GREECE AND ROME

The mythical narratives of the ancient Greeks and the Romans constitute a continuous tradition that extends from before the reach of history to the present day. Myths survive in literary texts and visual art because their narratives have continued proved compelling and fascinating in different languages, historical eras, and social contexts (the myths of Odysseus, Heracles, and Oedipus are just a few examples). Literature and art of all kinds have been inspired to retell and represent their stories, while the search for the meaning of mythic stories has informed and profoundly influenced a great range of intellectual disciplines including literary criticism, anthropology, and psychoanalysis. In these ways, myths have and continue to exercise a fundamental influence on western culture and, in consequence, even today they maintain a certain cosy familiarity. On the other hand, the historical contexts in which the Greeks and Romans told and retold these mythical narratives are to us in the twenty-first century culturally alien and unfamiliar.

The aim of the course is two-fold: insofar as Greek and Roman culture is fundamental to the development of western culture, students will achieve a deeper historical understanding of the latter; yet because the world of the Greeks and Romans is in many ways radically different to our own, students will develop the conceptual tools for comprehending another culture and so enhance their ability to understand and critique their own cultures. The course is also one of the Foundations courses and as such is intended to provide students with a solid grounding for undergraduate study by cultivating generally applicable and transferable skills; these include the development of clear and logical academic writing, critical and analytical skills for reading and understanding texts, constructive participation in group discussion and debate (in tutorials), and basic methods and techniques of research.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 1105 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1106 = AP/CLST 1106 9.0 EGYPT IN THE GREEK AND ROMAN MEDITERRANEAN

An examination of Egypt and Egyptians in the imagination and history of the cultures of the Greek and Roman Mediterranean.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 2110 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2110 9.00.

AP/HUMA 1115 = AP/CLST 1115 9.0 TRANSFORMATION OF ANCIENT LITERATURE

Many great writers have reused the literature of the past in order to create new works of art. In order to understand the works of Shakespeare, Milton, Racine, Montaigne, Sartre, and Shaw, among others, we need to know how they refashioned and transformed the works of classical authors, such as Aeschylus Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, and Plutarch. This course examines works of literature from ancient Greece and Rome and modern adaptations of those works. Particular attention will be paid to changes linked to differences in religion, politics, and social structure. Topics may include Comedy, Tragedy, Satire, Essays, and Fables. Works may include Sophocles' Antigone and Anouilh's Antigone: Plautus' Amphitryo and Giradoux's Amphitryon; Aeschylus' Agamemnon and James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice; Sophocles' Oedipus the King and Robert Heinlein's Double Star. There will also be some attention to the use of classical themes in visual art. Because this is a Foundations course, there will also be attention to the development of critical skills and writing.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HUMA 1115 9.0

AP/HUMA 1710 = AP/CLST 1710 6.0 THE ROOTS OF WESTERN CULTURE

Two historical cultures have had an important role in shaping modern thought: the Graeco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian. This course explores these cultures through selective study of their literature, philosophy and religious thought.

Successful completion of this course partly fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies. Alternatively, it can be counted for Classical Studies major or minor credit. It cannot, however, be counted both towards the General Education requirements and the Classical Studies major or minor.

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces are reserved for Year 01 students.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1110 9.00.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HUMA 1710 6.00, AS/HUMA 1110 9.00.

AP/LA 1000 6.0 ELEMENTARY LATIN

This course is designed for those who have little or no training in Latin. No knowledge of the language is assumed. The course focuses on the acquisition of reading skills and the fundamentals of the Latin language: vocabulary, morphology (forms), and syntax. Students will also gain practice in translation, listening, pronouncing, and some composition; an introduction to Roman culture; and a better understanding of the English language through Latin cognates and comparison of syntactical structures. The course uses the so-called restored Pronunciation of Latin. After the course, students may move to the intermediate 2000-level Latin course and then on to the advanced 3000-level and 4000-level Latin courses at York.

PREREQUISITE: None. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed. No one who has completed an upper-level university Latin course may enroll in this course. No one may enroll in this course and an upper-level Latin course simultaneously. This course is designed for those who have little or no training in classical Latin.

AP/LA 1010 = AP/HUMA 1010 3.0 WORD POWER: BUILDING ESSENTIAL ENGLISH VOCABULARY USING LATIN AND GREEK ROOTS

This course is designed to teach students how to build their vocabulary systematically through the study of Latin and Greek elements in essential English words in a variety of fields and to learn how to use this knowledge in a practical way in their academic courses and later for the advancement of their chosen careers. Emphasis is placed on important Latin and Greek elements used in current scientific, medical, legal, literary, and artistic contexts.

PREREQUISITE: None. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed.

GL/HUMA 1622 = GL/LIN 1622 6.0 INTRODUCTORY LATIN

A course for students with little or no previous training in Latin. The course covers the rudiments of Latin grammar and provides practice in the translation into English or French of sentences and short passages from Latin authors.

Course credit exclusion: AP/LA 1000 6.00. AK/LA 1000 6.00, AS/LA 1000 6.00 (prior to Fall 2009).